Connectivity

This season’s hottest beach accessory is…your smartphone?

Three-quarters of sunbathers say they use their phone at the beach—for both business and pleasure.
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Sunbathers might forget an umbrella, cooler, or sunscreen, but most aren’t leaving their phones behind when they flock to the beach.

According to a new Morning Consult survey commissioned by Verizon, three-quarters of respondents reported using their mobile phones at the beach—for taking photos (87%), for making personal calls and sending texts (72%), or for playing music (66%).

But it’s not all fun under the sun: More than half of the respondents—especially Gen Z and millennials—said they’ve used their phone at the beach for work. Almost 20% of the work-from-beach crowd confessed to doing so without their employers’ knowledge.

All of this confirms what we already knew: We’re more likely to throw our phone into our beach bags than other essentials. Some people are even willing to suffer a sunburn for it.

Morning Consult found that more than a third of respondents would rather forget to use sunscreen than forget their phone at home. That number climbs even higher, to 47%, among the Gen Z crowd.

But wait, there’s more tech you can expect to see on the sand. Of the 2,200 US adults surveyed last week:

  • 34% said they bring and blast a Bluetooth speaker
  • 27% said they pack and pop in wireless headphones
  • 11% reported using their tablet or laptop while the waves lap at them.

Is Tech Brew part of that small but mighty percentage? We’ll never tell. Now pass me a White Claw—and my phone!

Keep up with the innovative tech transforming business

Tech Brew keeps business leaders up-to-date on the latest innovations, automation advances, policy shifts, and more, so they can make informed decisions about tech.