Tech

Here’s what tech workers in the US make in 2022

Breaking down tech salaries by location, role, and more.
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If you want to make a lot of money, the conventional wisdom goes, you should simply learn to code.

But how much money? A new report just dropped that can shed some light on that question. Here are a few takeaways from Hired’s 2022 State of Tech Salaries report.

Location: In terms of annual salaries for tech workers, Miami the Bay Area (duh) led all US markets. On average, tech workers there made $174,063 in 2022, up ~4% from the prior year.

  • The average salary for remote tech workers was $162,950—clocking in at the third-highest “market” in the US, trailing only the Bay and Seattle.

Role: On average, engineering managers make $196k in the US, per Hired, the most of any position in its report. Software engineering is next, at $160k, with product management ($158k), DevOps ($156k), and designer ($153k) roles all close behind.

  • Data analytics and QA salaries were the lowest of the seven roles, bringing in $138k and $129k, respectively.

Experience: On average, US tech workers with one to two years of experience make $120k per year. The biggest jump in pay comes early on, per the report, as on average those with two to four years under their belts see a 20% jump in salary from the one-to-two-year bracket. Pay increases with more experience, but the jumps grow less pronounced over time, per Hired’s data.

Company size: On average, tech roles in large enterprises (1,000+ employees) make $162k in the US, while those at companies with 300-1,000 workers make $164k. Those at smaller companies (75-300 employees) make $162k, while those at companies with 75 employees or fewer make $158k. Hired says that’s the narrowest salary gap between startups and corporates since 2019.

Zoom out: Tech workers know their worth: Half of them expect salary increases by next year, and ~90% said they’d immediately start looking for a new job if they were denied an expected raise.

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