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Report finds tech's racial, gender pay disparities narrowing but still present

Women in tech are paid less than men, and Black and Hispanic people less than white and Asian people.
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Dan McCarthy

· less than 3 min read

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Last week, Hired, a tech-focused jobs marketplace, released its fifth annual report on pay disparity in tech across the US, the UK, and Canada.

High-level takeaway: Although the gap(s) have narrowed, the general story stays the same. For the same job, women in tech are paid less than men, and Black and Hispanic people less than white and Asian people. A rundown of key data points...

  • 59% of the time, men were offered higher pay than women for the same job at the same company, down from 65% in 2019.
  • On average, women in tech were offered 2.5% less than men for the same roles, down from 4.4% the prior year.
  • Overall, the gap was widest for Black men, who made $0.89 on the dollar compared with white men, and then Black and Hispanic women, who each made $0.90.

Zoom out: Hired’s data focuses on racial and gender pay disparities for the same job title. But tech companies still have a long way to go in making those roles (particularly high-paying technical roles) accessible to women, Black, and Hispanic people in the first place.

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